Following initial horror over crush that killed 45, blame game begins between various authorities and officials who planned, approved and oversaw mass festivities at holy site

TIMES OF ISRAEL
After tragedy, reports emerge that politicians pressed not to limit Meron event
by Staff
May 1, 2021

As the initial shock and horror over Thursday night’s deadly crush at Lag B’Omer festivities on Mount Meron began to subside, focus started to turn on Friday toward the matter of who was to blame for the packed conditions at the site that led to the deaths of 45 people and the injuring of dozens of others in the fatal stampede. Stark questions will likely be directed at political, civil and law enforcement officials involved in planning, approving and securing the event, amid talk of a potential state commission of inquiry to thoroughly investigate the disaster. On Friday night, multiple reports in Hebrew media outlets indicated that there had been immense pressure by religious lawmakers ahead of the festivities to ensure that there would be no limits placed on the number of attendees. Some 100,000 ultra-Orthodox pilgrims ultimately attended the eventREAD MORE

ARUTZ SHEVA Additional Meron tragedy victims named The names of some of the 45 people who were killed Thursday night in a stamped at the gravesite of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai in Meron have been published.

ISRAEL HAYOM Israel grieves for Lag B’Omer stampede victims Forty-five people were killed and 150 wounded in the worst civilian disaster to ever strike the Jewish state. Local businesses, Arab communities in the country’s north rally to aid victims’ families. Thousands donate blood.

TIMES OF ISRAEL IDF: Female soldiers were attacked by Haredim when assisting at Meron disaster Military says Home Front Command Search and Rescue forces ‘continued on their mission’ after being accosted while searching for bodies and injured victims after stampede

NEW YORK POST Terrifying video shows moments before deadly stampede at Israeli holy site

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